CATHOLIC – BUT NOT ROMAN

ORTHODOX - BUT NOT EASTERN<

HOLY TRINITY CELTIC ORTHODOX CHURCH

A beacon of light shining amid the darkness of error 

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 THE CELTIC ORTHODOX CHURCH IS UNIQUE – BY THE GRACE OF GOD

 

HOME OF THE TRADITIONAL LATIN

LITURGY OF ST. GREGORY THE GREAT 

 

WE ARE THE ANCIENT CHURCH STILL LIVING

THE FAITH AS ONCE DELIVERED TO THE SAINTS

 

The Celtic Orthodox Church is so

Ancient it demands respect, so

Traditional it is refreshing and so

Conservative it is reassuring  

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HOLY TRINITY CELTIC ORTHODOX CHURCH

THE MONASTIC CHAPEL FOR THE

CELTIC ORTHODOX BENEDICTINE FATHERS

1703 Macomber St., Toledo, Ohio 43606

Phone 419.206.2190

HOME PAGE: http://www.celticorthodoxchurch.com

E-MAIL: amdg@bex.net

 

MASS SCHEDULE

SATURDAY - SABBATH MASS 9:00 A.M.

SUNDAY - THE LORD’S DAY MASS 9:00 A.M. 

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THE DIVINE OFFICE OF THE

CELTIC ORTHODOX BENEDICTINE FATHERS

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TO PRAY AS DID THE EARLY CHURCH

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THE BENEDICTINE MONASTIC DIURNAL

IS A GIFT FROM THE ANCIENTS TO US TODAY

AND OUR LEGACY TO A GENERATION NOT YET BORN

 

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Christ continues to bring the love of the Father to His people and reveal His own love for us from the Tabernacle on the Altar. Christ continues to be our Savior, our Redeemer, our life, our sweetness and our hope. From the Tabernacle on the Altar Christ ALONE remains the gate of Heaven, the SOLE arbiter and dispenser of all God’s Graces and gifts; The Mediator of all graces. We are healed by the Sacred Wounds of Christ, we are redeemed by His Precious Blood and we are made clean by His spoken word.  It is impossible to be sealed in the Blood of the Lamb without also experiencing the power of the Mass, as the Eucharist is what seals us in the Blood of the Lamb. The Benedictine Monastic Diurnal is an extension of the Mass and is oriented toward the Mass.

 

St. Benedict calls the disciple to the school of the Gospel: “Let us walk in the paths of the Lord by the guidance of the Gospel” (R Prol). By these words the Father of monks expresses his intention to estab­lish a life patterned after the Gospel. This is the only true foundation on which a community rests.  St. Benedict was well aware that his work represented an embodiment of the Gospel.  St.  Benedict called the Monastic Diurnal the “OPUS DEI”, which is Latin for “WORK OF GOD.”   

   

The Jews, Greeks, and Romans divided the hours between sunrise and sunset into 12 parts, and the Jews devoted certain of those intervals to prayer. These Old Testament time divisions developed into the Church's "canonical hours" or "offices" at which times prayers (psalms, canticles, antiphons, responsories, etc.), are prayed and together with the Mass form "The Divine Office". The term Divine Office means divine duty and refers to the obligation of all clergy to offer daily Mass and daily pray the prayers of the “Officium Divinum”, the "Liturgical Office," "The Benedictine Monastic Diurnal composed by St. Benedict (A.D. 480-543) writes of the canonical hours in the Rule he wrote for his religious Order: 

    As the Prophet saith: "Seven times a day I have given praise to

    Thee, this sacred sevenfold number will be fulfilled by us in this

    wise if we perform the duties of our service at the time of Lauds,

    Prime, Terce, Sext, None, Vespers, and Compline; because it was of

    these day hours that he hath said: "Seven times a day I have given

   praise to Thee." For the same Prophet saith of the night watches:

    "At midnight I arose to confess to Thee." At these times, therefore,

    let us offer praise to our Creator "for the judgments of His justice”

namely, at Lauds, Prime, Terce, Sext, None, Vespers, and compline”    

These prayers of the Divine Office are most often said by religious and clergy, in fact, they are obligated to do so. Early Church Councils and Sacred Tradition have made it mandatory for clergy. The term Divine Office means Divine Duty and refers to the obligation of all clergy in the Celtic Orthodox Benedictine Fathers to daily offer the Divine Sacrifice of the Mass and daily pray the Benedictine Monastic Diurnal.

 

THE CANONICAL HOURS

 

Certain prayers are so important that they represent the official public Prayer of the Church.  Chief among these is the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass, which unites us spiritually and physically to God.  In second place of importance are the seven Canonical Hours of the Benedictine Monastic Diurnal (Divine Office) which hours sanctify the different parts of the day and keep us ever in the sight of God.  The Hours of the Office may vary in length and solemnity, but together they form a unified approach to our daily communication with God, reflecting the themes of the current liturgical season and daily feast days.  Like stars surrounding the infinite brightness of the sun, which is the Mass, the Hours of the Benedictine Monastic Diurnal merge with the Mass to form a single prayer, the public worship of God in the name of the Church, elevating our souls and inspiring our thoughts, words and deeds.  When we pray the Benedictine Monastic Diurnal we are praying with St. Benedict and with the early church Fathers in the same words they used.  The Divine Sacrifice of the Mass, used by the Celtic Orthodox Church and most of Western Rite Orthodoxy, and the Benedictine Monastic Diurnal we use are both exactly what was used by St. Benedict and the early church.

 

You will notice the numbering of the Psalms is according to the Septuagint Text of the Old Testament.  The Septuagint Text is the official translation of the scriptures used by Holy Orthodoxy and is used in the Divine Office and in the Divine Sacrifice of the Mass. St. Benedict and the early church used the Septuagint Text.

 

The Benedictine Office is made up of seven separate sets of prayers called 'hours', although in reality they are much shorter than that to say.

The names of the hours are:

  * Lauds (at first light);

  * Prime (first thing in the morning);

  * Terce (mid-morning);

  * Sext (midday);

  * None (mid-afternoon);

  * Vespers (sunset); and

  * Compline (before bed).

They are called the hours because they mark the turn of them.

 

THE BENEDICTINE MONASTIC DIURNAL IS AVAILABLE THROUGH AMAZON AND OTHER FINE BOOK RETAILERS.